Broccoli is one of the most nutritious vegetables, providing vitamin C, potassium, B vitamins (including folate)—even some calcium and iron. Eating all parts of broccoli— even the leaves—is a good idea.

30 grams of broccoli leaves contain 90% of the vitamin A. Vitamin A is crucial for eyesight and proper immune function. The same amount of leaves contains 43% of your daily dose of vitamin C.

Next time you cook a broccoli flower, chop some leaves up and throw it in too.

Broccoli stems have a wonderful mild sweet flavor and are much higher in fiber than the florets; they are renown for the amount of extra fiber they can add to your diet.
While the florets contain more beta-carotene than the stalks, the leaves actually are a richer source of beta-carotene than either the stems or florets.
When cooking broccoli it is best to peel off the tough outer layer of the stem before cooking. Slice them into medium size pieces and cook for 2-3 minutes before adding the florets; add the leaves along with the florets.
And remember when selecting broccoli florets that the dark green, bluish-green, or purplish-green color contain higher concentrations of beta-carotene than pale green or yellowish-green florets.
http://i1.wp.com/theimprovementclub.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/rsz_do_not_throw_away_broccoli_stem.jpg?fit=640%2C480http://i1.wp.com/theimprovementclub.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/rsz_do_not_throw_away_broccoli_stem.jpg?resize=150%2C150kbHealth & Fitnessbroccoli,health
Broccoli is one of the most nutritious vegetables, providing vitamin C, potassium, B vitamins (including folate)—even some calcium and iron. Eating all parts of broccoli— even the leaves—is a good idea. 30 grams of broccoli leaves contain 90% of the vitamin A. Vitamin A is crucial for eyesight and proper...